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SCAN FETAL DEATH Tables


Fetal Death
Live Birth
Fetal Death Rate
95% Confidence Intervals Calculation
Gestational Age
Weight
Residence Data
Race
Rate Calculations With Small Numbers

ANIMATED FORMULAS
This link shows formulas used to calculate rates with examples.

FETAL DEATH VARIABLE INFORAMTION
This link lists all fetal death variable information.

FETAL DEATH: Death prior to the complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of human conception, irrespective of the duration of pregnancy; the death is indicated by the fact that after such expulsion or extraction, the fetus does not breathe or show any other evidence of life, such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord, or definite movement of voluntary muscles. (Definition recommended by World Health Organization in 1950). A fetal death is required to be reported if the fetus has completed or passed the twentieth week of gestation or weighs 350 grams or more. (Weight criteria effective in 1978). Vital Statistics Laws and Regulations 61-19: Vital Statistics, Section 21(a). Heartbeats are to be distinguished from transient cardiac contractions; respirations are to be distinguished from fleeting respiratory efforts or gasps.

LIVE BIRTH: The complete expulsion or extraction from its mother of a product of human conception, irrespective of the duration of pregnancy, which, after such expulsion or extraction, breathes or shows any other evidence of life, such as beating of the heart, pulsation of the umbilical cord, or definite movement of voluntary muscles, whether or not the umbilical cord has been cut or the placenta is attached. (Definition recommended by World Health Organization in 1950). Heartbeats are to be distinguished from transient cardiac contractions; respirations are to be distinguished from fleeting respiratory efforts or gasps.

FETAL DEATH RATE: Fetal deaths over live births plus fetal deaths (see animated formulas).

95% CONFIDENCE INTERVALS CALCULATION: r + 61.981*(r/n)1/2
Where r = fetal death rate, n = number of fetal deaths plus live births, and 61.981=1.96 * (1000)1/2.
When frequencies are less than 100 then 95% confidence intervals are calculated using the formulas provided on pages 98-102 in the NCHS 2001 Birth Report a pdf document.

GESTATIONAL AGE: Gestation is the period between conception and birth of a baby, during which the fetus grows and develops inside the mother's uterus. Gestational age is the time measured from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle to the current date and is measured in weeks. A pregnancy of normal gestation is approximately 40 weeks, with a normal range of 38 to 42 weeks. Infants born before 37 weeks are considered premature. Infants born after 42 weeks are considered postmature.

WEIGHT: Weight of the fetus at delivery measured in grams.

RESIDENCE DATA: Data allocated to the place in South Carolina where the person normally resided, regardless of where the event occurred.

RACE: Information on race of the mother and father is reported on birth and fetal death certificates, and the race of the decedent is reported on death certificates. Fetal deaths are reported by race of mother. As of 1990, Live Births are reported by race of mother instead of race of child. This change allows South Carolina's birth data to be consistent with the National Center for Health Statistics and other states throughout the United States. For statistical purposes, the tables in this report are based on the broad classifications of "white", "black", "other" and "unknown".

RATE CALCULATIONS WITH SMALL NUMBERS: There are variations in all statistics that are the result of chance. This characteristic is of particular importance in classifications with small numbers of events where small variations are proportionately large in relation to the base figure. As an example, small changes in the number of deaths or births in small population areas or in the number of deaths from uncommon causes could result in large changes in these crude rates. For this reason, rates for counties with small populations or other small bases should be used cautiously.

GRAMS WEIGHT CONVERSION CHART

500 grams or less = 1lb. 1 oz. or less
501 - 1,000 grams = 1 lb. 2 oz. - 2 lb. 3 oz.
1,001 - 1,500 grams = 2 lb. 4 oz. - 3 lb. 4 oz.
1,501 - 2,000 grams = 3 lb. 5 oz. - 4 lb. 6 oz.
2,001 - 2,500 grams = 4 lb. 7 oz. - 5 lb. 8 oz.
2,501 - 3,000 grams = 5 lb. 9 oz. - 6 lb. 9 oz.
3,000 - 3,500 grams = 6 lb. 10 oz. - 7 lb. 11 oz.
3,501 - 4,000 grams = 7 lb. 12 oz. - 8 lb. 13 oz.
4,001 - 4,500 grams = 8 lb. 14 oz. - 9 lb. 14 oz.
4,501 - 5,000 grams = 9 lb. 15 oz. - 11 lb. 0 oz.
5,001 grams or more = 11 lb. 1 oz - or more

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